How to Break a Bad Habit

Bad habits interrupt your life and prevent you from accomplishing your goals. They can jeopardize your health — both mentally and physically and they waste your time and energy.

So why do we still do them? And most importantly, is there anything you can do about it?  How can you delete your bad behaviors and stick to good ones instead?

What causes bad habits?

Most of your bad habits are caused by two things… stress and boredom.

Bad habits are, most of the time, simply a way of dealing with stress and boredom. Everything from biting your nails to overspending on a shopping spree to drinking every weekend to wasting time on the internet can be a simple response to stress and boredom.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. You can teach yourself new and healthy ways to deal with stress and boredom, which you can then substitute in place of your bad habits.

Of course, sometimes the stress or boredom that is on the surface is actually caused by deeper issues. These issues can be tough to think about, but if you’re serious about making changes then you have to be honest with yourself.

Are there certain beliefs or reasons that are behind the bad habit? Is there something deeper — a fear, an event, or a limiting belief — that is causing you to hold on to something that is bad for you?

Recognizing the causes of your bad habits is crucial to overcoming them.

Don’t try to eliminate a bad habit without replacing it.

All of the habits that you have right now — good or bad — are in your life for a reason. In some way, these behaviors provide a benefit to you, even if they are bad for you in other ways.

Sometimes the benefit is biological like it is with smoking or drugs. Sometimes it’s emotional like when you stay in a relationship that is bad for you. And in many cases, your bad habit is a simple way to cope with stress. For example, biting your nails, pulling your hair, tapping your foot, or clenching your jaw.

These “benefits” or reasons extend to smaller bad habits as well.

For example, opening your email inbox as soon as you turn on your computer might make you feel connected, but at the same time looking at all of those emails destroys your productivity, divides your attention, and overwhelms you with stress; but, it prevents you from feeling like you’re “missing out” … and so you do it again.

Because bad habits provide some type of benefit in your life, it’s very difficult to simply eliminate them. (This is why simplistic advice like “just stop doing it” rarely works.  Instead, you need to replace a bad habit with a new habit that provides a similar benefit.

For example, if you smoke when you get stressed, then it’s not a great plan to “just stop smoking” when that happens. Instead, come up with a different way to deal with stress and insert that new behavior instead of having a cigarette.

In other words, bad habits address certain needs in your life. And for that reason, it’s better to replace your bad habits with a healthier behavior that addresses that same need. If you expect yourself to simply cut out bad habits without replacing them, then you’ll have certain needs that will be unmet and it’s going to be hard to stick to a routine of “just don’t do it” for very long.

How to break a bad habit

Here are some additional ideas for breaking your bad habits and thinking about the process in a new way.

Choose a substitute for your bad habit. You need to have a plan ahead of time for how you will respond when you face the stress or boredom that prompts your bad habit. What are you going to do when you get the urge to smoke? (Example: Go for a short walk instead.) What are you going to do when Facebook is calling to you to procrastinate? (Example: Write in a journal, make a menu for the week or read a good book.) Whatever it is and whatever you’re dealing with, you need to have a plan for what you will do instead of your bad habit.

Cut out as many triggers as possible. If you smoke when you drink, then don’t go to the bar. If you eat cookies when they are in the house, then throw them all away. If the first thing you do when you sit on the couch is pick up the TV remote, then hide the remote in a closet in a different room. Make it easier on yourself to break bad habits by avoiding the things that cause them.  Right now, your environment makes your bad habit easier and good habits harder. Change your environment and you can change the outcome.

Join forces with somebody. How often do you try to diet in private? Or maybe you “quit smoking” … but you kept it to yourself? (That way no one will see you fail, right?)

Instead, pair up with someone and quit together. The two of you can hold each other accountable and celebrate your victories together. Knowing that someone else expects you to be better is a powerful motivator.

Surround yourself with people who live the way you want to live. You don’t need to ditch your old friends, but don’t underestimate the power of finding some new ones. If you don’t know where to start, joining a gym or wellness center (such as the new well) can provide many like-minded people for you to choose from.

Visualize yourself succeeding. See yourself throwing away the cigarettes or buying healthy food or waking up early. Whatever the bad habit is that you are looking to break, visualize yourself crushing it, smiling, and enjoying your success. See yourself building a new identity. Create a vision journal, cut out pictures of what you see as success, write a mission statement and continue adding to it as your journey changes or you reach milestones.

Get back on track.  We all slip up every now and then, when you veer off track, skip a workout, eat foods that are bad for you or sleep in, it doesn’t make you a bad person. It makes you human!  What separates top performers from everyone else is that they get back on track very quickly.  This is not about being all or nothing, it is about steadily reaching your goal, two steps forward and one step back is still one step forward!

Breaking bad habits takes time and effort, but mostly it takes perseverance. Most people who end up breaking their bad habits try and fail multiple times before they make it work. You might not have success right away, but that doesn’t mean you won’t get it!

~You haven’t failed until you stop trying~

The Biggest Loser Community Challenge and Information Night…

The new well is proud to announce that we have partnered with Asante, the Chamber of Commerce, KOBI, and KAJO/KLDR to bring to Grants Pass the Biggest Loser Community Challenge. This fun, health and wellness challenge will get our community moving, eating better, having fun and losing weight! Compete against family members, friends, coworkers and other companies in our community for exciting prizes! You will earn points by simply drinking your water, eating nutritious foods and staying active, bottom line, the more participation the greater your chances of winning prizes. If you want to know more about the Community Challenge the new well will be hosting an information night on Monday, February 22nd at 5 pm at the Club Northwest, You can also visit the Biggest Loser Website www.biggestlosercommunity.com/thechallenge or call the new well  at 541-471-2224.

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For more information http://www.biggestlosercommunity.com/thechallenge